Tag Archives: esperanza verde

Jungle Diaries: 1

Day of the turtles The evening that the final piece of rescue centre paperwork arrived, I joked to Douwe and Olivia that tomorrow the animals would start arriving. In my defence I think I joked it would be jaguars. Early the next day a rumour was circulating in the nearby village that the ministry was on its way with 20 turtles. 20 was nothing to worry about. But as the day went on the number had risen to 200, a bit more of an issue. Douwe went across to the village to try and contact the ministry, but they’d already left to come to us. With nothing else to be done we waited. I will admit at this point I joked that knowing Peruvians it would be 2000 turtles. I was wrong. When the ministry arrived they had 2 enormous buckets almost overflowing with confiscated baby turtles. IMG_3280 Carrying the buckets as quickly as possible to the house, the decision was made to empty the turtles onto the floor of the volunteer house. A landslide of live, dead and semi-live/dead turtles covered the floor and we worked to spread them out before too many suffocated. IMG_3313 Of course some were very alive and instantly went running before we could barricade the other rooms. (The last of these was recovered from behind the toilet the next morning and was reunited with his buddies!) IMG_3359 With the ministry workers helping we set about getting the live ones ready for immediate release back into the river. The first thing we did was grab the turtles that were still trying to run around and organise them into groups of 10. These were placed into the large buckets 200 at a time. With the first lot ready to go we headed down to the river to do the single biggest release of Esperanza Verde yet. We sent around 1000 of these baby turtles back into the wild on the first go. IMG_3456 IMG_3492 The ministry had brought some press and cameras with them so videos of Lauren and I looking like we knew what we were doing were played on Peruvian TV for the next week. Lauren even gave an interview, but we’re not sure if it made the cut. IMG_3410 Back at the house the process was repeated several times until all of the turtles that seemed fine were released. The other volunteers had finished the afternoon feed at this point and came to help. Of course the stress and the transportation meant that in total around 10% of the turtles were dead on arrival. In the hopes that some still had some life in them we lined them up to make it easier to see if one moved. IMG_3445 The turtles had been poached as they were hatching along the banks of a river. Judging by the number of turtles it was a large number of nests. The culprit had been trying to sell them from their house and a group of children from a nearby school telephoned the authorities to report them. This seems a good sign for the future of nature conservation in the area. IMG_3477 Some of the last turtles stayed with us for several weeks until they recovered sufficiently to be released. And before we knew it the last of the 3,300 were back in the river where they belong. It goes without saying that I’m no longer allowed to make jokes about animals arriving. Thousands of turtles were a challenge…but Jaguars…

Monkey Mischief at Esperanza Verde

Life wouldn’t be life at Esperanza Verde without its resident monkeys. And not a day goes by when one of them doesn’t get up to some sort of mischief.

Within a few days of arrival we got used to the feeling of being watched. Whilst the monkeys enjoy the freedom of the jungle their favourite past time is watching us.

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They stare in fascination as you go about your daily activities and watch in wonder through the wire mesh as you work with the animals in cages.

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Every morning we woke up to Nakoya, a baby woolley monkey, hanging above our heads peering through the wire mesh window. She liked to watch us sleep and made little “oh, oh” noises when we’d stir and look up at her…

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Watching us prepare the twice-daily food rounds was the best viewing…

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But even just watching us read in a hammock was worth hanging around for…

Though when our jobs cause us to venture outside the monkeys will often be found “helping”. As we sweat in the midday sun, digging, raking or swinging an axe, Willow particularly likes to be involved. It’s a tough life being a monkey.

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Sorry were you trying to rake here??

A quick task of cleaning the drinking bowl attracts Willow’s help yet again…

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And a simple photography session turns into me gaining a student; Nakoya just couldn’t resist seeing what my fascination was with this strange black box…

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If the monkeys aren’t “helping” then it’s fair to say they probably entertaining us all. Mica wearing a discarded t-shirt and walking on her hind legs was unforgettable. Just like when she stole as many of the oatballs she could get her hands on…cue a bit of face stuffing…

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One evening at dinner the subject of the monkey drinking bowl came up in conversation. After a few minutes it transpired between us we had refilled the bowl an astonishing 15 times in one day. Fearing there may be a leak we kept an eye out the next day and found the culprit…

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Turns out Geordie, one of the capuchin monkeys, had found the sink plug and was proudly showing off his work to Mica.

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But even with the sink plug firmly jammed in, Mica was splashing out the water to empty it…I like to think she was giggling at our stupidity every time…

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So at times the monkeys ran rings around us, but life just wouldn’t be the same without them…even when they steal your shoes and eat them. They’re charming, annoying, adorable all at once and sometimes you’d be convinced they were plotting their next mischief…

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More monkey mischief soon…

If you’d like to volunteer at Esperanza Verde or simply make a donation then get in contact with Olivia at info@esperanzaverdeperu.com or via the website at http://www.esperanzaverdeperu.com/

Esperanza Verde: Volunteering with Animals in South America

In the last few months we had considered many times taking a break from life on the road and volunteering, preferably with animals. Finding ourselves in the South American city of Lima and asking ourselves the question “what shall we do next?” it seemed like the prefect time.

We found Esperanza Verde online, loved the sound of the project and pretty much jumped on the first plane to the jungle. When we arrived we fell in love immediately.

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Esperanza Verde is a Wildlife Protection Centre based in the Amazon Basin. It is currently home to an array of rescued native animals and the numbers are ever increasing. It was started 5 years ago by Olivia and Douwe, and with the help of their 2 children and an army of volunteers over the years, they have created something pretty special in their little patch of jungle.

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Day-to-day life varies and there is never a dull moment. The jobs range from feeding the animals, helping with the construction of new cages, carrying sandbags to assisting with veterinary work. It was rare that 2 days of the week would ever be the same as there is always a new job that crops up to keep you on your toes. Like bathing some baby squirrel monkeys for example…

Squirrel Monkey Bath

But of course a day doesn’t go by at Esperanza Verde without spending a good part of it with all the adorable animals. We hope to introduce you to a few more of the residents over the next few weeks but here’s just a handful that stole our hearts.

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Here is the resident sloth, Elmo. Raised from a baby and free to come and go as he pleases, the lure of a few carrot sticks and sliced sweet potato keeps him hanging around in the nearby trees.

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This is Nakoya the resident baby female Woolley Monkey. Along with Willow and Kamari the two male Woolleys, she enjoys the freedom of the jungle but is always hanging around ready to enjoy her milk three times a day.

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And this is the lovely Rincay, a tapir with rare blue eyes. He used to have the freedom to roam but unfortunately kept roaming as far the local village and eating peoples clothes off the washing line. Fearing for his safety he now shares a large enclosure with Pepito, a tortoise, but still enjoys eating the volunteers t-shirts when they are not paying attention…

The aim is with most of the animals to release them back into their natural environments but for a few this isn’t a reality. Many of the monkeys enjoy the safety of the nearby jungle but never roam far from the feeding table. Whereas some, like the Macaws, whose wings are broken and therefore cant fly, must instead enjoy life in the large aviary. But with ample food they happily shout “Hola” as we go about our daily work.

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When we weren’t doing all of the above you’d often find us on the construction site for Olivia and Douwe’s house. (They have spent 5 years camping in the volunteer house, poor things!) In just six weeks it was amazing to see the house begin to take shape, going from mere foundations to a structure with floors, a few walls, a roof and a working sink! Before we arrived an Ikea wardrobe was about as far as my construction skills went…but now sawing wood, sanding and (badly!) hammering in nails is all part of day-to-day life.

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Life is basic but in our eyes bliss. You’re kept fit and healthy running around after all the animals, the food is local, fresh and plentiful and there’s often a campfire and a few cocktails in the evening. So if you’re thinking of volunteering but not sold on the animals alone, you’ll be sold on the people and the lifestyle.

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We hope to keep you entertained with a few more tales from our time in the jungle soon but in the meantime if you’d like to volunteer or simply make a donation then get in contact with Olivia at info@esperanzaverdeperu.com or via the website at http://www.esperanzaverdeperu.com/