Inca Trail Day 3

Day three saw everyone getting into the routine. We were woken by coffee being wafted outside the tent, which was then again dismantled and heading up the trail before we’d even has a chance to notice. Breakfast was a delicious porridge to warm up our limbs. Manny once again motivated us with promises of awesome vistas and a bit more caffeine. Within 45 minutes the group was ready to go.

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The walk out of the campsite went straight up 200m to the top of the next pass. After 100m we stopped at the Tambo (resting place) on the route. These stops were part Inn, part watch tower/customs and part house on the trail. This one had spectacular views down to our last campsite and back up to dead woman’s pass.

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We headed on up the pass for more views.

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At this point in the trail Manny explained how offerings were historically made at the top of the pass. We offered some coca leaves (traditional) and some Haribo (because we could).

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The next part of the trail was down again, steeply to the Inca city of Sayacmarca. This is definitely one of the most impressive ruins on the trek. Similar to Machu Picchu it sits on a high ridge looking down into a valley, apart from the roofs, the buildings are excellently preserved.

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From here we could see down to the lunch spot. Once again indicated by the distant yellow dots!

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Manny explained that the rest of the day would see us ascending one final pass before a very steep and long descent that would put us within sight of Aguas Calientes.

The path up to the pass was beautiful, the mountain rising above us to our right and cliffs dropping down to our left with views of the forests below.

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There were also some Inca tunnels, places where the trail builders decided it would be better to go through the rock than around it.

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And then the storm arrived. We had avoided rain on our trek so far and technically it still wasn’t raining. The hailstones were large enough to be painful and the path turned completely white with ice balls in minutes. We struggled on in to the wind with the lightning flashing all around.

At the top of the pass Manny was waiting and asked if the group wanted to wait for everyone before heading down. Very aware of the 2 metal poles strapped to my back as lightning rods I checked if I was the tallest gringo. I was relieved to see that another trekker should be struck by any lightning before I was. But not wanting to hang around, we valiantly decided it was every man for themselves on this occasion and headed off the mountain top.

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The descent for the rest of the day was treachorous and breathtaking. We passed through series of complex ruins along a narrow winding walkway. At places the Incas had cut tunnels in the rock and at one point around 30 stairs had been carved directly into a huge boulder. The path was difficult until the hailstones melted and then we just had to deal with the water flowing down the trail.

Towards the end of the trail we emerged into a series of Inca farming terraces, these beautifully formed marvels were the most extensive we’d yet seen and the roaming llamas meant there was some great photo opportunities.

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Here’s a photo of Lauren and I in our ponchos…

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The best bit of the terraces was that when we looked down them along the path we suddenly realised we could see the yellow dots! Our trusty Chaskis were only a short distance away and we could almost smell the hot chocolate from where we stood.

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We hurried down to the campsite and happily pulled on some warm clothes. We’d made it to the final campsite Winay Wayna.

The fourth and final day is up next…

 

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